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Watch Fred Armisen and Bill Hader’s Excellent Talking Heads Parody Band

This hasn’t been thoroughly researched by us, but we have to believe that Documentary Now!Fred Armisen, Bill Hader, and Seth Meyers’ documentary parody series on IFC—has spawned more fake/real bands to perform on late night television than any other show in history. First, it was the gentle, 1970s-style, AM radio, yacht rock group The Blue Jean Committee that played the show around this time last year

Now, it’s Test Pattern, a new wave group heavily inspired by Talking Heads. The band will be the subject of the October 5 episode, “Final Transmission,” which satirizes the 1984 Talking Heads concert film Stop Making Sense. Ahead of that, they made their television debut on Late Night with Seth Meyers, performing a jangly and alternative song unconventionally and appropriately titled “Art + Student = Poor.”

The set design is directly inspired by Talking Heads’ performance of “Making Flippy Floppy,” with the television screens displaying non-sequitur phrases and images in a basic font on a flat-colored background. As for the song itself, it’s part of what makes Armisen and Hader’s parody bands so effective: The music is actually serviceably good. “Art + Student = Poor” is a strong, albeit slightly ridiculous, and jaunty track. Although really, it’s not much more outlandish than some of its source material.

It’s going to be a few weeks before Test Pattern makes their Documentary Now! debut, but the good news is that the show returns very soon; tonight, actually, so tune in, and maybe keep an ear to the ground about a potential Test Pattern album. The Blue Jean Committee released one, so why not?

Featured image: NBC; Late Night with Seth Meyers

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